10 fruits with high and low sugar

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10 fruits with high and low sugar

We tell you what fruit the amount of sugar rolls over, and which, on the contrary, tends to zero.

reading will take 🕑 3 minutes



High Sugar Fruits

Figs

10 g sugar in one large fruit


Just a couple of fig berries “cost” about 4 spoons of sugar - this is a minus. Plus: a large amount of fibre will not allow digesting all the glucose at once. Well, an impressive list of vitamins and minerals can not be discounted. In figs, there are vitamins of group B, vitamins C and K, calcium, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, potassium and zinc.

Grapes

15 g sugar per cup of berries


Perhaps not the most dietary berries, but rich in vitamins (C, K, group B), minerals, and dark grapes also contain polyphenols - substances with antioxidant action.

Watermelon

18 g sugar in one slice


The average slice of watermelon is 3-4 teaspoons of sugar, just keep this in mind when reaching for a third or fourth portion. True, there are also enough nutrients in watermelon: about a third of the daily requirement of vitamins A and C plus vitamins of group B and minerals — calcium, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, potassium, zinc.

Cherries

19 g sugar per cup of berries


A large amount of sugar is compensated by the content of vitamins and minerals: there are calcium, calcium, potassium, magnesium, iron, and a serious dose of vitamins A and C in the sweet cherry.

Mango

46 g sugar in one medium fruit


There is a lot of sugar in mango - more than in a can of Coca-Cola. But, unlike soda, it contains fibre, mango is rich in vitamins C (200% of the daily requirement), A (72%) and B 6 (20%), contains calcium, magnesium and iron. We don’t urge to refuse completely, especially if you are in, say, a Thai resort, but you shouldn’t eat mango either.

Low Sugar Fruits

Avocado

1 g sugar in the whole avocado


Avocado, of course, is not the first thing that comes to mind when it comes to fruit. Nevertheless, there is practically no sugar in it, but a lot of healthy fats, half of the daily requirement of fibre and a quarter of vitamin B 6.

Raspberries

5 g sugar per cup of berries


In the raspberry, firstly, there is little sugar, and secondly, a lot of fibre - more than in any other berries. Plus half the daily intake of vitamin C, calcium, magnesium, iron and vitamin B 6.

Kiwi

6 g sugar in one fruit


One kiwi is the daily intake of vitamin C and many other nutrients, including vitamins of group B, an impressive dose of vitamin K (approximately 30% of the required daily amount) and vitamin E (one and a half kiwi is 10% of the daily requirement). And all this with a relatively low sugar content!

Blackberry

7 g sugar per cup of berries


The ideal combination, as in raspberries: low sugar content plus a large amount of fibre (20% of daily requirement).

Strawberry

7 g sugar per cup of berries


A modest sugar content combined with a long list of vitamins and minerals - strawberries really have something to love. Per serving daily intake of vitamin C plus vitamins E, K and group B, calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, zinc and about one-fifth of the daily requirement of manganese.

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